21, Slytherin.

Multifandom blog: Doctor Who (classic, new, big finish), Sherlock, Game of Thrones, Harry Potter and many others.

~ I fangirl about Ancient Egypt, musicals and the Cthulhu mythos ~

Reblogged from addictedtostorytelling  62 note
addictedtostorytelling:

lost appreciation week: day 7: whatever you want 
the women of lost 

the women of lost deserve an appreciation week all of their own. 
not only did lost boast one of the most diverse female casts in television history, but it also created one of the most woman-inclusive fantasy universes in television history. 
on lost, we got to enjoy female characters young and old, of various races, with differing abilities and interests, playing pivotal roles in the narrative. no one type of femininity or womanhood was promoted over another; women could be soft and hard, aggressive and passive, outspoken and quiet, heroic and cowardly, sometimes even within the course of a single scene. 
one of the most engaging aspects of the show was how it depicted women interacting with other women, from ana lucia and libby’s friendship to rosseau and alex’s mother-daughter bonding to claire’s eventual jealousy for kate. lost presented women who could be enemies, friends, confidantes, uneasy allies, and family to one another, and it did so beautifully. 
so many of the show’s triumphs come from creating and telling stories about female characters as interesting and nuanced as the premise of the show itself. 

addictedtostorytelling:

lost appreciation week: day 7: whatever you want

the women of lost

the women of lost deserve an appreciation week all of their own.

not only did lost boast one of the most diverse female casts in television history, but it also created one of the most woman-inclusive fantasy universes in television history.

on lost, we got to enjoy female characters young and old, of various races, with differing abilities and interests, playing pivotal roles in the narrative. no one type of femininity or womanhood was promoted over another; women could be soft and hard, aggressive and passive, outspoken and quiet, heroic and cowardly, sometimes even within the course of a single scene.

one of the most engaging aspects of the show was how it depicted women interacting with other women, from ana lucia and libby’s friendship to rosseau and alex’s mother-daughter bonding to claire’s eventual jealousy for kate. lost presented women who could be enemies, friends, confidantes, uneasy allies, and family to one another, and it did so beautifully.

so many of the show’s triumphs come from creating and telling stories about female characters as interesting and nuanced as the premise of the show itself.