21, Slytherin.

Multifandom blog: Doctor Who (classic, new, big finish), Sherlock, Game of Thrones, Harry Potter and many others.

~ I fangirl about Ancient Egypt, musicals and the Cthulhu mythos ~

Reblogged from whosmycutiepie  161 note
scififantasytv:

Moffat Previews Series 8 in Radio Times
 Deep Breath - Killers stalk London in the late 1890′s. A restaurant that is actually a slaughterhouse and a buried spaceship see the Doctor confronting a long-forgotten foe.
Into The Dalek - A miniaturised team embark on a fantastic voyage into a Dalek so damaged it has become good.
Robot of Sherwood – The Doctor discovers an evil plan from beyond the stars in Sherwood Forest. Who is real and who isn’t?
Listen – What scares the Doctor? Ghosts of the past and future crowd into the lives of the Doctor and Clara; a terrified caretaker in a children’s home, the last man standing in the universe, and a little boy who doesn’t want to join the army… “What’s that in the mirror, and the corner of your eye? What’s the footstep following, but never passing by?”
Time Heist - The Doctor is tasked with breaking into the Bank of Karabraxos, the deadliest in the cosmos. He is helped by a beautiful shape-shifter and cyber-augmented gamer. But nothing can prepare them for the Teller: a creature that can detect guilt.
The Caretaker - Clara has it all under control, so long as everybody in her life never actually meets, but then Coal Hill welcomes a new relief caretaker with a Scottish accent, while the Skovox Blitzer is ready to destroy humanity.
Kill the Moon - In the near future, the Doctor and Clara arrive on a decrepit shuttle making a suicide mission to the Moon. Crashing on the lunar surface, they find a mining base full of eviscerated corpses, spider-like creatures scuttling about in the dark, and a terrible dilemma.
Mummy on the Orient Express - The Mummy is stalking the passengers and if it sees you you have 66 seconds to live. Clara sees the Doctor at his most deadliest and most ruthless and realises it’s time to say goodbye.
Flatline - Clara is now separated from the Doctor and discovers a threat from another dimension. But how do you hide when even the walls are no protection? With no Doctor around, Clara goes against a foe that exists beyond normal perception.
In the Forest of the Night – The human race wakes up to the most surprising invasion yet: the trees have moved back in. Everywhere a forest has grown overnight and taken back the Earth.
Dark Water / Death in Heaven - In the mysterious world of the Nethersphere, plans have been drawn. Old friends and old enemies manoeuvre around the Doctor, and an impossible choice is looming over him. Death is not an end, promises the organisation known as 3W. “You betrayed me. You betrayed my trust, our friendship, and everything I’ve ever stood for. You let me down.”

scififantasytv:

Moffat Previews Series 8 in Radio Times


Deep Breath - Killers stalk London in the late 1890′s. A restaurant that is actually a slaughterhouse and a buried spaceship see the Doctor confronting a long-forgotten foe.

Into The Dalek - A miniaturised team embark on a fantastic voyage into a Dalek so damaged it has become good.

Robot of Sherwood – The Doctor discovers an evil plan from beyond the stars in Sherwood Forest. Who is real and who isn’t?

Listen – What scares the Doctor? Ghosts of the past and future crowd into the lives of the Doctor and Clara; a terrified caretaker in a children’s home, the last man standing in the universe, and a little boy who doesn’t want to join the army… “What’s that in the mirror, and the corner of your eye? What’s the footstep following, but never passing by?”

Time Heist - The Doctor is tasked with breaking into the Bank of Karabraxos, the deadliest in the cosmos. He is helped by a beautiful shape-shifter and cyber-augmented gamer. But nothing can prepare them for the Teller: a creature that can detect guilt.

The Caretaker - Clara has it all under control, so long as everybody in her life never actually meets, but then Coal Hill welcomes a new relief caretaker with a Scottish accent, while the Skovox Blitzer is ready to destroy humanity.

Kill the Moon - In the near future, the Doctor and Clara arrive on a decrepit shuttle making a suicide mission to the Moon. Crashing on the lunar surface, they find a mining base full of eviscerated corpses, spider-like creatures scuttling about in the dark, and a terrible dilemma.

Mummy on the Orient Express - The Mummy is stalking the passengers and if it sees you you have 66 seconds to live. Clara sees the Doctor at his most deadliest and most ruthless and realises it’s time to say goodbye.

Flatline - Clara is now separated from the Doctor and discovers a threat from another dimension. But how do you hide when even the walls are no protection? With no Doctor around, Clara goes against a foe that exists beyond normal perception.

In the Forest of the Night – The human race wakes up to the most surprising invasion yet: the trees have moved back in. Everywhere a forest has grown overnight and taken back the Earth.

Dark Water / Death in Heaven - In the mysterious world of the Nethersphere, plans have been drawn. Old friends and old enemies manoeuvre around the Doctor, and an impossible choice is looming over him. Death is not an end, promises the organisation known as 3W.
“You betrayed me. You betrayed my trust, our friendship, and everything I’ve ever stood for. You let me down.”

johnwatsonismyspiritanimal:

Of all the lines to include from the canon, did Mofftisson REALLY have to include the “get your wife under control” line? I literally flinched upon hearing that come out of Sherlock’s mouth and not just because it’s so blatantly, disgustingly sexist. But also because it’s a 10 pound reference being shoved into 5 pound bag of a scene. It. Just. Doesn’t. Fit. 

Like, where the fuck would Sherlock even learn that sort of painfully obviously outdated attitude from? Certainly not from his parents since we see in HLV that Mr. Holmes is respectfully in awe of his wife’s intelligence and nature. 

Boarding school? Maybe? Although I would have a hard time believing that the wealthy elite of England are so far behind the times to actually believe that it is still a man’s duty to control his wife’s behavior in all settings. Maybe tutting and gossiping behind a woman’s back for not choosing a “woman’s profession”, sure. But to have an environment where it’s acceptable to speak those sorts of things out loud and to someone’s face? And again, by showing us the Holmes parents in both TEH and HLV, we’re meant to get this sense that Sherlock grew up in a perfectly normal household. In fact, Moffat and Gatiss have said that they think of Sherlock and Mycroft as analogues for Niles and Fraiser Crane from the television show ‘Fraiser’. Two normal, middle class parents just happen to have two incredibly smart sons that for some unknown reason are oddballs. 

And how does John not smack Sherlock across the face for it? Or even Mary for that matter? I mean, apart from a look, she just stands there and takes it. When before they’ve gone out of their way to show us that she doesn’t tolerate Sherlock’s bullshit. She’s not blinded by his flashy intelligence and sharp tongue like John is. She will call him out on it. 

I just don’t understand how no one thought maybe that line doesn’t fit after shooting wrapped on that scene. Was the editor asleep this season? Did Moffat and Gaitts and Thompson only have time to write first drafts? Is this faux pas itself a homage to ACD’s lackadaisical attitude towards continuity? 

Reblogged from consultingaytective  7.991 note
221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:
Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.
We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.
Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.
If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself. But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here. With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.

221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:

Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.

We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.

Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.

If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself.

But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here.

With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.

We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.